WaiWai: The Cook, the Beast, the Vice and its Lover

This article is reproduced from the discontinued, but much loved Mainichi Waiwai column by Ryann Connell. Read more about this at the bottom of this article.

A disgusting and twisted restaurant in the Tokyo entertainment district of Roppongi is enticing warped rich folk with the opportunity to figuratively have their cake and eat it, too — with animals, according to Jitsuwa Knuckles (9/25).

Roppongi’s bestiality restaurant is being regarded by its main nouveau riche patronage of young company presidents and venture capitalists as a decadent practice only possible among the wealthy.


“Apparently, the restaurant started off quietly in the basement of a building that a real estate agent in Roppongi who couldn’t find any other tenants,” an S&M club worker identified only as M tells Jitsuwa Knuckles. “News about the restaurant spread through word of mouth and it became popular.”

M says she visited the members-only restaurant about half a year ago after being invited there by one of her regulars, a well-heeled lawyer.

At first glance, the first floor restaurant appears fairly nondescript. When a customer goes in, they give their name to a receptionist. When they are approved, they pass through a wooden door to be greeted by another door, this one made of metal. Passing a membership card over a scanner outside the door will automatically open it. Inside is an eatery that resembles just about any other Italian restaurant.

Membership in the restaurant is open only to those with an annual salary of at least 20 million yen, and a minimum cash flow of 100 million yen.

“After we got into the main restaurant, an employee escorted us down to the basement,” M says. “The walls were pitch black and the floor covered in a blood red carpet, so I guess the place must be a refurbished S&M club.”

Once the customer feels prepared, they will be presented with beast of their choice. In the lawyer’s case, it was a sow.

“I’d been told what to expect, but when I actually saw what was happening, it was as shocking as you’d imagine it to be,” M tells Jitsuwa Knuckles. “Later, the lawyer told me the appeal of the place just came about because when people have got money and done everything else, they turn toward bestiality.”

Once the lawyer had finished porking the pig, the couple returned to the first floor and sat at a table to dine. M says she was totally shocked when staff members carried in roast pork — made of the same sow the lawyer had earlier been with.

“I was about to vomit,” M says. “It was the same pig that had been squealing just moments before. Now, it had been roasted whole. I managed to avoid eating it by only having salad.”

Incidentally, prices range from 200,000 yen to 500,000 yen for a chicken, dogs cost somewhere between 300,000 yen and 800,000 yen, while pigs and goats start at around 800,000 yen. Charges are higher depending on whether the creature is female and how active it is.

“The owner says he is prepared to cook up any kind of animal at all,” M tells Jitsuwa Knuckles. “He even said he’d prepare elephants … but I think he might have been joking about that.”

〜★〜★〜★〜★〜★〜★〜★〜★〜

(The Mainichi Waiwai column ran online from April 19, 2001 – June 21, 2008. It was a much loved form of entertainment amongst foreigner in and outside of Japan. To any reader it was obviously not serious news, but it was a set of articles that portrayed quite well how the Japanese tabloids actually write about their own country. In 2008, a small number of Japanese people bought it to the attention of rival news groups that Mainichi was running an anti-Japan column on its website. With the bad publicity, Mainichi was forced to shut the page down, and take punitive measures against the journalists that were working on it, claiming that it was receiving opinions that were critical of the column, such as “its contents are too vulgar” and “the stories could cause Japanese people to be misunderstood abroad”. A perfect example of how Japanese consider what they write in their own script to be an acceptable secret code, that the rest of the world cant understand. When that same tabloid rubbish gets inconveniently translated to English to make light of some aspects of the Japanese people, it gets canned. Stippy.com finds this unacceptable, and will reproduce as much of the Waiwai content as possible in order to bring it once again to our computer screens for a good laugh. Of course we claim no credit for this content, and attribute it to it’s writers who were former Mainichi employees. Waiwai in its true and glorious form has been discontinued, but it’s legacy will live on at stippy.com for all to enjoy.)

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